Skip to content

Video – Burns: The Practical Stuff

This video demonstrates the assessment and management of burns, using equipment that is recommended within the locality at the time of production. Remember to check your local, current guidelines before putting anything into practice. Produced by HCPs and students.

For Adult Patients: What to do when you have a high temperature or feel unusually cold (video)

This video has been created by Paramedics in response to the number of patients we are coming across who are unsure what to do when they have a high temperature or don't know that the signs and symptoms they are experiencing may mean that they have a high temperature. I hope the below video is helpful and informative. If there are any concerns, please let me know in the comment box below.

Airway ›

I-Gel: Why, What, When, How?

An Article 999 video produced by paramedics for operational staff, explaining the why, what and when of I-Gels and demonstrating how to insert them. This video has been referenced accordingly and will be peer reviewed. A shorter version of the video will be uploaded soon. This video has not been endorsed by any organisation, author or ambulance trust. You must refer to local guidelines and read Article 999's full disclaimer, available at www.article999.co.uk/about/ (disclaimer tab), before putting into place anything you see or read here.

Article Summary: Maxillofacial Trauma Patient

Summary of 'Maxillofacial trauma patient' (Krausz et al, 2009). An article discussing the importance of effective airway management in the maxillofacial trauma patient and the complexities that such an injury presents. Only points relevant to UK paramedics have been included. For more details, please read the original article.

OP Airways VS LMAs and ETI

According to research by Khosraven et al (2015) one of the main disadvantages of an OP airway is that its length, shape & lack of an inflatable cuff may cause oxygen to leak, leading to less oxygen than we might hope for entering the patient's lungs.

Breathing ›

Free Ventilator Downloads from Smiths Medical

So far, Article 999 has a reasonable collection of information and videos about positive pressure breathing and ventilators used in prehospital emergency care. Smiths Medical is behind the PneuPac ParaPac. […]

Ventilators: How?

This is a shorter version of the Ventilator: Why, What, How, When? video, featuring the how-to only.

Circulation ›

PARAMEDIC-2 Trial Results

  ‘For more than 50 years, treatment strategies have included the use of various drugs, but there is limited evidence that such treatments are effective’ (Perkins et al, 2018). Now […]

Considering the Differential Diagnoses of Chest Pain? Consider This.

We tend to consider acid reflux as one of the differential diagnoses of chest pain. We, or the patient's GP might advise them to alter their acidic diet. We might even suggest they take their own gaviscon if it's available. But the patient might be suffering from too low acid, not too high. And gaviscon and omemprazole might worsen their symptoms. This is a guest post written by Paul Burgess of Athletic Nutrition (athleticnutrition.tv).

Capacity, Consent, Mental Health ›

What is a section?

A sectioning order is legislation powers given to health care professionals and police officers under the Mental Health Act's of 1983 and 2007 that allow for compulsory admission of an individual to hospital or a place of safety.

Who can enforce a sectioning order?

Nurses, doctors, police officers and mental health professionals whose requests are approved by police officers all have sectioning powers. Their powers vary in accordance with the law. The type of section they can place also varies between them. Paramedics do not have sectioning powers. Read more...

When can you say an adult lacks capacity?

If the person cannot: ‘understand the information relevant to the decision’ ‘retain that information’ Remember, the person only needs to retain this information long enough to decide ‘use or weigh […]

Disability ›

What is a section?

A sectioning order is legislation powers given to health care professionals and police officers under the Mental Health Act's of 1983 and 2007 that allow for compulsory admission of an individual to hospital or a place of safety.

Who can enforce a sectioning order?

Nurses, doctors, police officers and mental health professionals whose requests are approved by police officers all have sectioning powers. Their powers vary in accordance with the law. The type of section they can place also varies between them. Paramedics do not have sectioning powers. Read more...

Video Library ›

Video – Burns: The Practical Stuff

This video demonstrates the assessment and management of burns, using equipment that is recommended within the locality at the time of production. Remember to check your local, current guidelines before putting anything into practice. Produced by HCPs and students.

Ventilators: How?

This is a shorter version of the Ventilator: Why, What, How, When? video, featuring the how-to only.

Fast Facts ›

PARAMEDIC-2 Trial Results

  ‘For more than 50 years, treatment strategies have included the use of various drugs, but there is limited evidence that such treatments are effective’ (Perkins et al, 2018). Now […]

Article Summaries ›

Should Patients Take Caffeine-Containing Analgesics?

Many of our patients have high temperatures, especially during COVID outbreaks. Some of them are taking over the counter pain relief as required. This is of course recommended, however many of our patients are also tachycardic due at least in part to their high temperatures. When they complain of palpitations, do they need to be aware of the effects of caffeine-paracetamol combinations? Should they be taking this combination at all, or should they simply ease off dietary sources of caffeine while taking analgesics? Here are a few quotes on the subject. Full references are below.

What does NICE say about head injuries?

NICE guidelines are great, but they're annoying sometimes. They're lengthy, and it can be hard to find only the content that is directly relevant to frontline ambulance clinicians. Here is a summary of their head injury guidelines, showing only the points and quotes that are relevant to us. Article 999: Simplifying, Presenting, Refreshing.

PARAMEDIC-2 Trial Results

  ‘For more than 50 years, treatment strategies have included the use of various drugs, but there is limited evidence that such treatments are effective’ (Perkins et al, 2018). Now […]

Video – Burns: The Practical Stuff

This video demonstrates the assessment and management of burns, using equipment that is recommended within the locality at the time of production. Remember to check your local, current guidelines before putting anything into practice. Produced by HCPs and students.

What is Negative Pressure Breathing?

Negative pressure breathing is how we breathe normally, without the aid of bag-valve-masks or mechanical ventilators. This article describes the process and begins a series on breathing and ventilator mechanics.

What is positive pressure breathing?

Positive pressure refers to the way artificial ventilation ‘inflate[s] the lungs’ (Hess & Kacmarek, 2014). ‘Normal breathing depends on drawing in air to the lungs by creating a partial vacuum […]

What is the relief pressure dial on the ventilator?

The relief pressure dial on the ventilator ensures that the pressure of ventilation is not so high that it causes problems but allows it to be high enough to help ensure that the patient actually is ventilated. Read more...

What is a section?

A sectioning order is legislation powers given to health care professionals and police officers under the Mental Health Act's of 1983 and 2007 that allow for compulsory admission of an individual to hospital or a place of safety.

Who can enforce a sectioning order?

Nurses, doctors, police officers and mental health professionals whose requests are approved by police officers all have sectioning powers. Their powers vary in accordance with the law. The type of section they can place also varies between them. Paramedics do not have sectioning powers. Read more...

What are the main sections used for?

The various parts of the law applicable to mental health sectioning are Section 2, 3, 4, 5, 135 and 136 but Community Treatment Orders also enable sectioning. These allow for durations of 6 hours, 72 hours, 28 days or 6 months, depending on the type of section. Read more to find out which types provide those durations...